Eight Point Two


Sally Fawcett Dig Deep Races 2014 race report

trail races suffolk trail races peak district

 

Sally was the first female runner to cross the finish line of the 2014 UTPD, part of the Dig Deep Peak District weekend.  You might also remember her from the training diary films that we have made.  Sally has sent us her race report which you can have a read of below…

 

Well done to everybody who took part – it was a fantastic weekend.

 

Sally Fawcett over the finish line of the UTPD the Dig Deep Races 2014

 

UTPD Report

 

My build up to the UTPD had been fantastic up to 2 weeks prior to the race. I had recovered well from The Highland Fling and done some good, long training runs. Then I needed a wisdom tooth out! I thought the week or so of rest wouldn’t be a problem and had loads of soft food sorted for when I couldn’t chew. I hadn’t banked on the sprained jaw resulting in munching paracetamol and ibuprofen right up to 4 days before the race. I didn’t run for 9 days, but did manage a couple of 10 mile walks. So, with 3 days to go I decided to do Grindleford Fell Race, if I couldn’t do 5 miles pain free I wasn’t going to manage 60 miles! I was very sensible with my pacing and completely non- competitive (see I can take it easy!) but was relieved to get through it with mild aching in the jaw only, and even upped the pace for the last half a mile to test it fully. So, the race was on!

 

On the race morning a had a bowl of granola and a couple of mugs of coffee but didn’t go mad with breakfast, instead I planned to eat from early on in the race. I had a plan to eat every 30mins, alternating a Shot Block and a third of a Chia Flatjack. This worked really well up to around 8 hours in, then I just drank Cherry Coke and had a Shot Block every about every 30-40mins. As it was hot I was glad of the two 500ml bottles on my Salomon Vest, I worked out I went through 7 bottles of water, 2 of diluted Coke and one undiluted Coke which wasn’t a massive amount for the length of time out but I felt I got this right.

 

From the first few miles of the race I realised I was in a good position, the first guy went off really quick, 2nd and 3rd were a little way ahead but then a group of 5 of us remained pretty close together right up to Moscar. I was very disciplined, always being the first to walk the hills when the guys around continued to run. I settled into 8th place and let them go ahead, but always in sight until the descent from High Neb. We came onto a long road section here and it was great to have Matt from Dark Peak, out for a cycle, deciding to keep me company and ride alongside me from 30-33miles. This was great as I wasn’t feeling my strongest here, I even said to Matt if I get to Edale (42miles) I’m on the train route so can drop out. He said not to be so stupid, of course I will be feeling drained as I have run over 30 miles and I was looking better than the guys in front! Those miles passed really quickly, just by having someone to chat to. Before I knew it the 5 of us had all more or less come back together and reached the second feed station at the bottom of Win Hill together, so I must have been running well to catch them up.

 

Win Hill came at 34 miles in, only ¾ of a mile but a hell of a climb, I actually enjoyed this as it was shaded through Parkin Clough and allowed a good long walk! At the top it was great to see Smiley Pacer Julie, she was actually about to head down as she thought she must have missed me. Along to Crookstone Barn one of the guys dropped back and I didn’t see him again. I settled into 7th place, walking more than the others but feeling surprisingly good. The descent into Edale was pain free, my quads were holding up well! The guys in front were temporarily out of sight, they must have set off up Hollins Cross at quite a pace but I knew there were plenty of climbs left. Near the top of Hollins Cross a group of chav’s, tops off, mobile phone blaring music out asked what was going on, when I told them how far I had run they offered me their water saying I’d need it more than them! I thought the descent from Hollins Cross would be more painful than it was so I must be getting the pacing right. Onto Cave Dale, this was a lovely climb, up ahead I was surprised to see two of the guys I had been in the group with earlier running at a very catchable pace! Before long I made my way past each, stopping for a quick chat but without much effort I found myself in 5th place moving away from them, managing a good pace along the top of Cave Dale all the way into Bradwell.

Sally on Win Hill, photo copyright of  Summit Fever Media

Sally on Win Hill, photo copyright of Summit Fever Media

 

More familiar faces, Isobel and Ken, appeared on the approach to the third feed station, 49 miles in and I was feeling ok! Quick chat, fill up of the water bottles, wetting of the Buff and hat and I was off for the final push.

Bradwell Edge is not a nice climb, at least it wasn’t quite the mud bath I have seen it every other time. It’s hard to get into a rhythm when you’re slipping and sliding on the mud but the really muddy sections were few and far between. It was still a relief to get onto the flat section along the river from Shatton to Hathersage, this was one of my favourite bits as it was shaded, fairly flat and nice and soft underfoot. As I crossed the railway line up the field from Hathersage I was relieved to know this was the last steep climb, and what a lovely suprise to hear the cow bells as Isobel and Julie ran across the field with Lotty and Karl from their house, so motivating for the last few miles.

 

Ian was still just about in sight (him in 4th, me in 5th place) as I climbed out of Hathersage onto Ringinglow Road, but then Ian had a real kick and pushed the pace. He was out of sight in no time, I thought with 6-7 miles to go that was far too early to push on, but he let me know at the finish, that’s where he spotted 2nd and 3rd place not far ahead! He managed to catch them but they pulled away as he’d put everything into the chase.

 

I carried on up to Carl’s Walk, relieved to be in the last few miles, picturing the beer and pizza at the finish! Turning onto Houndkirk Road I was able to get a good pace for 58+ miles, even managing a 8.53 min mile! Julie, Michael, Isobel and Ken again popped up unexpectedly at Houndkirk giving me a boost for the last effort. Through Limb Valley I was running the whole way, even the hills, I think all that caffine was getting me through these miles on a bit of a high!

 

My aim was for sub 11 hours so I was delighted to come into the finish at 10 hours 43 mins in 5th place, with a new female course record. It was only then I found out how close the 2nd – 4th place guys had been in front. It was probably best not knowing, as I would have pushed myself and no doubt suffered for it if I had thought to try to chase them down! Looking at the data I averaged 10’42 per mile at 5.6mph, a stat I’m really chuffed with considering the 2722m of ascent. If you like hilly races this is definitely one for you.

I just wanted to finish by saying thanks to the those who came out to support, the Smiley Paces were so  encouraging, it is so motivating to see a familiar face when you have raced all those miles and really spurred me on to the finish 🙂

 

 

Sally Fawcett over the finish line of the UTPD the Dig Deep Races 2014

Sally Fawcett over the finish line of the UTPD the Dig Deep Races 2014, Photo copyright of Summit Fever Media

Advertisements


Dig Deep 2014

Dig Deep Peak District Races 2014

Image

Event report.

The forecast was once again great for the 2 days of races we had planned. Last year’s heat was crippling so a slightly cooler forecast was welcome.

Friday night was kicked off with James Adams talking about his epic run through America followed by a showing of The Dragons Back which is an absolute classic and inspiring film. Most of the Ultra Tour of the Peak District (UTPD) runners registered Friday evening along with some of the Intro Ultra runners meaning that there was a good crowd developing in the campsite with nearly 100 happy campers and the smell of BBQ’s drifted over to the main barn at Whirlow Hall farm!

Saturday started bright and early with the UTPD leaving at 8am followed by the Intro Ultra’s at 10am. In both races the early leaders became the eventual winners. Sally Fawcett won the senior female UTPD race and broke the female course record in 10.43.25. Sally is having quite a season following her great run on the Highland Fling earlier in the year. Ken Sutor won the senior male category and had a very strong race with a winning time of 09.47.30.

The Bradwell feed station was the main stopping point for both ULTRA races. The buffet available for the runners was like a smorgasbord of all things great for ULTRA runners! From Pineapple to pork pies it was all there and seemed to be the highlight for many runners – some didn’t want to leave!!!

 Mention must go to the back runners who carried on throughout the night. The last runner’s dibbed in at the finishing line 22 hours and 59 minutes after starting!

The Intro Ultra saw a determined Marcus Scotney win senior male by 30 minutes in an impressive time of 04.05.03. Could the course go in under 4 hours? We shall see! Most of the runners loved the hilly nature of the course but Win Hill is always a stopper for tired legs. However, the views from the top on Saturday were outstanding!

Marcus was back with us on Saturday offering his insights in to the elite Ultra Runners World with his lecture. If you ever get an opportunity to go to one of Marcus’s lecture you should take it! A very inspiring and informative individual. Unfortunately Mammut sponsored runner Helen Bonsor was unable to talk because of a last minute illness – get well soon Helen!

Sunday dawned warm and sunny again and so the 12.12 and Whirlow 10k started at 10.15 and 10.30 respectively. Both races are quite hilly with the 12.12 going out over Burbage Moor on to Higger Tor and back via the Limb Valley – both exceptionally beautiful trails in spectacular scenery!

The Whirlow 10k is a fundraising event with every penny of the race going to the Whirlow Hall farm Trust. Nearly £2000 was raised from this race alone!

The total prize pot was nearly £5000. With over £2000 worth of prizes from Mammut and Outside, £2000 worth of prizes from Ultimate Direction and copies of Wild Running and Clif products there was plenty to go around. All 1st placed runners in all age categories in both the ULTRA’s and the 12.12 received a £100 voucher from Mammut/Outside plus other goodies.

The feedback for the event has been overwhelming with so many kind comments. The team at 8.2 worked really hard to put the event together so were suitably proud. The date for next year’s event is set for the 15th and 16th August 2015 with booking available from August this year!

Many thanks to all the organisations and sponsors involved; Mammut, Outside (retail partner), Ultimate Direction, Clif, Whirlow Hall Farm Trust, Wild Running, Summit Fever and Fell Running Guide (Dave Taylor) and Shane Ohly (kind loan of the Dragons Back film).

Ian Loombe.

Race director for Dig Deep Races

Eight Point Two



Dig Deep Peak District Weekend Programme 2014

Dig Deep Peak District 2014 – Friday 20th June at Whirlow Hall Farm, Whirlow Lane, Sheffield S11 9QF, 

0114 235 2678

Talk/Film programme

Friday 20th June at Whirlow Hall Farm, Whirlow Lane, Sheffield S11 9QF, 0114 235 2678

ENTRANCE IS FREE!

7pm – 8pm

James Andrews                        “Why I bother”

Image

James will be presenting a story of what he has learned about the human brain while running. James has been running ultras for about 7 years and over the past couple of years he has been reading and studying psychology. The talk is going to be a combination of what he has learned about the brain in the process, including;

  • What motivates it in general and throughout a race
  • How to deal with stress and paranoia that will attack you in a race
  • What to do when the task feels overwhelming, or boring, or pointless?
  • How to use your mental training to deal with novel event that might pop up in races
  • Some general tricks on making yourself feel awesome

Ultimately he hopes to answer the question “Why I bother?”

8.30 pm                         The Dragons back – Film

Image

The legendary Dragon’s Back Race™ follows the mountainous spine of Wales from Conwy Castle to Carreg Cennen Castle. This incredible 5-day journey is approximately 300 kilometres long with 17,000 metres of ascent across wild, trackless, remote and mountainous terrain. It is not a trail race.

The original Dragon’s Back Race™ happened in September 1992 and ever since, it has been whispered about with a mix of awe and trepidation. Its reputation had reached legendary status with fell, mountain and ultra runners the World over by September 2012 when the second Dragon’s Back Race™ happened.

The Dragon’s Back Race™ is one of the hardest mountain races in the World and this is the film of that event in 2012.

Saturday 21st June –at Whirlow Hall Farm, Whirlow Lane, Sheffield S11 9QF, 0114 235 2678

5pm                                    Iron Trail (film)

The Irontrail, held in Switzerland, breaks the 200 km barrier. With the start in Pontresina and the finish in Chur this film covers the event which Stages the Alpes’ highest altitude, longest, toughest and most beautiful single-stage trail race in the multi-faceted natural, cultural and mountain landscape of Graubünden – this is the thinking behind the Irontrail!

6pm – 7.30 pm           

Helen Bonser                        Taking on stage racing in the Alps

Image

Having grown up in the Lake District UK, and now living in Scotland, Helen has always been passionate about the outdoors and spending time in the hills. For her, hill running is a way of life, and is what continually pushes her forward – it enriches her life in adventure and rich friendships. Some of her favourite races are technical 1 day races in the Alps, and Alpine stage races, where she enjoys racing day after day in big mountain scenery. Helen still works full time, and it sometimes a challenge to fit both work and running in! Helen is a Mammut sponsored athelete.

Multi day stage races in the Alps are some of the most challenging and engaging racing experiences.  This talk gives a brief look into what’s involved, from the trails and terrain, to the training and preparation, and the racing itself, with examples from some of the major stage races currently in the Alps.

7.30pm – 8.50pm

Marcus Scotney                        The Peaks and troughs of Ultra Running

Image

The Peaks and troughs of Ultra Running – Team MONTANE International Ultra Runner Marcus Scotney will share, in his entertaining and motivational style, the highs and lows of his Ultra Running experiences where he has overcome physical and mental exhaustion and continued to dig deep rather than giving up.

9pm                                                 The Dragons back – Film

The legendary Dragon’s Back Race™ follows the mountainous spine of Wales from Conwy Castle to Carreg Cennen Castle. This incredible 5-day journey is approximately 300 kilometres long with 17,000 metres of ascent across wild, trackless, remote and mountainous terrain. It is not a trail race.

The original Dragon’s Back Race™ happened in September 1992 and ever since, it has been whispered about with a mix of awe and trepidation. Its reputation had reached legendary status with fell, mountain and ultra runners the World over by September 2012 when the second Dragon’s Back Race™ happened.

The Dragon’s Back Race™ is one of the hardest mountain races in the World and this is the film of that event in 2012.



Ultra marathon nutrition

We have now finished filming the 2nd in our series of three films following the training plans of three athletes who are all competing in the Ultra tour of the Peak District this June 21st/22nd.  This month we have been talking about the effects of nutrition on the body when competing in something as physically and mentally challenging as an ultra marathon.  Nutrition seems to be a minefield and in every article you read on it, you will find something that contradicts everything you have been taught.

The overriding message from listening to Sally, Amy and Matty’s opinions seems to be – listen to your body, and just use common sense.  Stay away from processed food on the whole – stick to meals that you make yourself from scratch but make sure that you treat yourself from time to time.  Interestingly both Sally and Amy mentioned that when they are racing in ultras, food becomes something to look forward to – something that drives you on to the next checkpoint, a reward for your efforts.   I have definitely found that when you are going through a low point in a race and you still have a long long way to go, the thought of launching myself on the food at the next checkpoint always picks me up…vulture.

Amy talked about how she likes making her own energy food and views gels as a last resort, Sally switches between both making her own and snacking on food such as Running Food’s Chia Charge and Matty is a huge fan of Torq gels as a source of immediate energy but also as it can bring the weight of his pack down.  I think it is very easy to get bogged down in reading various articles and following new superfood trends, and it is easy to forget that everybody is different.  What works for one person doesn’t mean it will work for everybody.  Some people crave sugar when running and others need savoury.   It’s also important to take into account what you find easy to digest – the last thing you want to worry about when you are 30 miles into a 60 mile race is your digestion playing up – there isn’t much to hide behind on Stanage Edge!

A tip I was given before my first ultra was to make sure to hydrate well before the race – and to actively go out of my way to drink way more water from about three days before hand.  With hindsight it seems quite obvious but then it didn’t even cross my mind to start hydrating before I was was even thirsty.   According to a few articles I’ve read we should be looking at drinking around 3 litres of water a day  (it seems to vary from researcher to researcher), just during a normal working day, how many of us can say we drink that much?!  It takes quite a lot of effort and a lot of bathroom trips to drink 5 pints!

Sally mentioned one thing that stuck in my mind, and that is that she makes sure she eats a colourful diet – that is one lesson that I had been taught years ago but i’d forgotten whilst being preoccupied trying to cram as many superfoods onto my plate as possible!

Possibly one of the driving forces for me was something Matty mentioned:  the great thing about running in ultras is that you are able to pig out at the end of them – 60 miles for as much macaroni cheese as I can eat – ok then!

Hope you enjoy the film and good look with the training…

 

It’s only 40 days until the Dig Deep Peak District

– still time to book yourself onto a race!  We have everything from a 60 mile to a 10k to choose from!

 

 

 

Trail races and ultra marathons in Suffolk

Check out our latest addition to the Dig Deep Race Series: Dig Deep Suffolk, 6th&7th September 2014.

Featuring 4 fantastic trail races through Suffolk:

5.5 mile Rendlesham Dash Suffolk Trail Race starts at 10:30am on Sunday 7th September £13.00

20KM Rendlesham Suffolk Trail race starts at 10:15am on Sunday 7th September £17.00

28 mile Suffolk Trail ‘Intro Ultra’ starts at 10am on Saturday 6th September £40.00

50 mile: ULTRA Tour of Suffolk (Suffolk trail ultra marathon) starts at 8am on Saturday 6th September £55.00

 

 



Ultra Running Training – keep it interesting!

Keep things interesting.

Sticking to a structured ultra marathon training plan, running the same routes at the same times of day can get really monotonous and hard to keep up. You see the same views, jump over the same puddles and if you’re not careful it can become more like a chore and less like fun. With a long lead up to a race, like the Ultra Tour of the Peak District (90Days) or The Ultra Tour of Suffolk (5 months) that original training plan can seem like a curse.. or worse still… boring.

 

Before you tear up that carefully crafted training plan and slam dunk it into the nearest bin just take a moment to think. Try taking your runs to different places, somewhere you’ve not been before. This new experience will boost your enthusiasm, your confidence and it’s always great to continue the search for “the perfect trail”. You never know what you might find, perhaps a view you never knew about or a hill that’s much better for hill reps than the ‘bump’ that you were believing was a hill. Trail running is meant to be fun, it’s meant to test you and let you forget the everyday stuff.

Parkin Clough

Root hopping on Parkin Clough

It’s not just excitement that new routes can bring you, venturing into the unknown will help hone your navigation skills, forcing you to use that map & compass instead of taking it as a token on your regular trail run. Perhaps it will bring into perspective where your nav skills are, allowing you to top them up where needed. Don’t forget, you can save minutes on race day easily by sharpening that nav – it’s not just fitness that will affect your time!

 

 

If you’re limited to where you can train and going somewhere new is more tricky, there are other ways to freshen things up. Why not run your route in the other direction, try it in the dark and at other times of day. Find a running partner, run with your dog, your neighbours dog (ask them first) – listen to an audio book, learn a language … you get the picture.

ultra marathon training

Running at Night can change your perspective of a route

 

So next time you’re feeling the boredom monster knocking at your door, think of something new for your next run, it’ll put a smile on your face and a spring in your step!

 

 

 

 

Trail races and ultra marathons in Suffolk

Check out our latest addition to the Dig Deep Race Series: Dig Deep Suffolk, 6th&7th September 2014.

Featuring 4 fantastic trail races through Suffolk:

5.5 mile Rendlesham Dash Suffolk Trail Race starts at 10:30am on Sunday 7th September £13.00

20KM Rendlesham Suffolk Trail race starts at 10:15am on Sunday 7th September £17.00

28 mile Suffolk Trail ‘Intro Ultra’ starts at 10am on Saturday 6th September £40.00

50 mile: ULTRA Tour of Suffolk (Suffolk trail ultra marathon) starts at 8am on Saturday 6th September £55.00

 



Matty Brennan – UTPD training Diary

Thanks to Matty Brennan for his first ultra marathon training diary installment.  We hope you enjoy reading what he is getting up to, whilst preparing for the Dig Deep Races UTPD!

Matty Brennan, training diary for UTPD

Matty Brennan, training diary for UTPD

I am currently in the 6th week of my 16 week UTPD training plan, and it’s starting to go well.  I think I’m pretty well recovered from my month of madness (just over 1 race per week from 1st December to the 18th of January – not recommended!) and feeling good.  Most of my training is either done on roads or canal path as I live about an hours drive away from any decent hills and have 2 small children and a wife who plays netball to share training time with.
 
My training plan comes from The Endurance Coach, which is based around a VO2 max test, with a 16 week training plan on the back of it with specific sessions and heart rate/pace to stick to.  I’m currently hanging around 40 miles per week, which will increase nearer to the race but not a great deal more – I put in a load of base training in the lead up to the Lakeland 100 last year, so it’s just speed I’m missing now!
 
Mostly this year my racing has consisted of cross country, and the Hardmoors 30 on New years day (where the photo is from – courtesy of Summit Fever Media).  Coming up is the Grizedale Trail Marathon next week, The Hardmoors 55 in March, the Highland Fling in April, the Old County Tops fell race (37 miles, 10,000ft of climb) in May, all in preparation for the UTPD in June.  Can’t wait!

Don’t forget that if you haven’t been on any parts of the courses for the Intro Ultra or UTPD then book yourself onto a Dig Deep Peak District RECCE day – coming up on March 16th – tickets £5 – Book Here!



Top 10 Presents for Runners!

It’s nearly Christmas and there are certainly a few of us at Dig Deep Race HQ who still have their Christmas Shopping to do! Just when you think Christmas is all under control, the days sneak by and suddenly before you know it the Christmas party is over, and it’s the last weekend before Christmas.  So for anyone out there struggling to think of any last minute pressies for the runners in your life here are our Top Ten Christmas Gifts for Runners!

1. Lightbender – by Nathan £20 – a great way to make sure you stay visible of long winter nights, or long distance summer ultras.  it’s an electro-luminescent band, which is completely waterproof and the watch battery will keep it flashing for over 100 hours.  And it’s a very awesome neat little gadget, which we are suckers for!

Image

 

2. Spikes – Kahtoola £50 – a lifesaver, every runner should have a pair of these handy spikes in their gear cupboard! Ever had that bambi on ice feeling? I have and these are so handy when running – they are flexible enough to slip around running shoes but also can be used on lightweight hiking boots.

Image

 

3. Navigation Courses with Fell Running Guide.  Perfect for your nearest and dearest, learn how to stay safe on the hills and to keep yourself out of harms way.  We have all been there…perfect sunny day on the moor and then bam – down comes the mist and visibility is zilch, and the moor becomes a featureless landscape! The Dig Deep Races 2013 were held on an unusually hot and clear day – but as we all know this is England, anything can happen!

4. Tech Tee RRP £45 SALE £29 – Good opportunity to snap up a bargain but hurry they are selling quick! This tech tee from Mammut for women, would be great for layering with a longer armed base layer underneath for winter, or perfect to hit the Summer trails in.  Nice cheerful colour and I found the fit flattering!

Image

 

5. Mammut X-Sun Headtorch £225 – Ideal for the fast and light person that has everything.  This is not just any old headtorch, this is a super all singing and dancing headtorch.  It’s waterproof to IXP6, has an Alpine Emergency Signal, four different modes, is super bright as you might expect from the price tag but also easy to dim for close up work.  Great for winter trail running at night!

Image

 

6. Bob Graham Round Map – £12 – do you know someone who has been talking about doing this for a while?  Time to give them a little bit of a push and get them one gnarly clad footstep closer to doing it!

Image

 

7. Clif Shotbloks – £2.49 – The ultimate stocking filler, and a big favourite! Those amazing little squares of pure gooey energy.  The only problem with them is that they are so hard to resist (incidentally very good at propelling you around the Dig Deep Intro Ultra 🙂 ) Once you start you just cant stop.  Now, which flavour?

Image

 

8. Garmin Forerunner 10 – £89 – I have left numerous hints around my desk incase my colleagues are feeling generous this Christmas!  Ideal present for all trail runners and gadgety types, or if someone you know is stepping up the training for the Ultra Tour of the Peak District and wants to track their progress.  Definitely on my wishlist!

Image

 

9. A place in the Dig Deep Intro Ultra – £40 – It would be rude not to include our own races on our list! Stupendously beautiful trail running race set in the heart of the Peak District National Park, run over peaks, along the crags and across the moors.  Then rest and recuperate in the Race Village and bask in the knowledge that you are now an Ultra Runner!  Sneaky present for yourself!

10. A place in the Ultra Tour of the Peak District – £60 – The biggy – 60 mile gnarly trail running race through the Peak District.  Speaks for itself.  Make the ultra runner in your life a very happy and excited person!

Image

Christmas presents for runners – trail running race in the Peak District

Most items can be found for sale on website of Outside our race retail partners.