Eight Point Two


Sally Fawcett Dig Deep Races 2014 race report

trail races suffolk trail races peak district

 

Sally was the first female runner to cross the finish line of the 2014 UTPD, part of the Dig Deep Peak District weekend.  You might also remember her from the training diary films that we have made.  Sally has sent us her race report which you can have a read of below…

 

Well done to everybody who took part – it was a fantastic weekend.

 

Sally Fawcett over the finish line of the UTPD the Dig Deep Races 2014

 

UTPD Report

 

My build up to the UTPD had been fantastic up to 2 weeks prior to the race. I had recovered well from The Highland Fling and done some good, long training runs. Then I needed a wisdom tooth out! I thought the week or so of rest wouldn’t be a problem and had loads of soft food sorted for when I couldn’t chew. I hadn’t banked on the sprained jaw resulting in munching paracetamol and ibuprofen right up to 4 days before the race. I didn’t run for 9 days, but did manage a couple of 10 mile walks. So, with 3 days to go I decided to do Grindleford Fell Race, if I couldn’t do 5 miles pain free I wasn’t going to manage 60 miles! I was very sensible with my pacing and completely non- competitive (see I can take it easy!) but was relieved to get through it with mild aching in the jaw only, and even upped the pace for the last half a mile to test it fully. So, the race was on!

 

On the race morning a had a bowl of granola and a couple of mugs of coffee but didn’t go mad with breakfast, instead I planned to eat from early on in the race. I had a plan to eat every 30mins, alternating a Shot Block and a third of a Chia Flatjack. This worked really well up to around 8 hours in, then I just drank Cherry Coke and had a Shot Block every about every 30-40mins. As it was hot I was glad of the two 500ml bottles on my Salomon Vest, I worked out I went through 7 bottles of water, 2 of diluted Coke and one undiluted Coke which wasn’t a massive amount for the length of time out but I felt I got this right.

 

From the first few miles of the race I realised I was in a good position, the first guy went off really quick, 2nd and 3rd were a little way ahead but then a group of 5 of us remained pretty close together right up to Moscar. I was very disciplined, always being the first to walk the hills when the guys around continued to run. I settled into 8th place and let them go ahead, but always in sight until the descent from High Neb. We came onto a long road section here and it was great to have Matt from Dark Peak, out for a cycle, deciding to keep me company and ride alongside me from 30-33miles. This was great as I wasn’t feeling my strongest here, I even said to Matt if I get to Edale (42miles) I’m on the train route so can drop out. He said not to be so stupid, of course I will be feeling drained as I have run over 30 miles and I was looking better than the guys in front! Those miles passed really quickly, just by having someone to chat to. Before I knew it the 5 of us had all more or less come back together and reached the second feed station at the bottom of Win Hill together, so I must have been running well to catch them up.

 

Win Hill came at 34 miles in, only ¾ of a mile but a hell of a climb, I actually enjoyed this as it was shaded through Parkin Clough and allowed a good long walk! At the top it was great to see Smiley Pacer Julie, she was actually about to head down as she thought she must have missed me. Along to Crookstone Barn one of the guys dropped back and I didn’t see him again. I settled into 7th place, walking more than the others but feeling surprisingly good. The descent into Edale was pain free, my quads were holding up well! The guys in front were temporarily out of sight, they must have set off up Hollins Cross at quite a pace but I knew there were plenty of climbs left. Near the top of Hollins Cross a group of chav’s, tops off, mobile phone blaring music out asked what was going on, when I told them how far I had run they offered me their water saying I’d need it more than them! I thought the descent from Hollins Cross would be more painful than it was so I must be getting the pacing right. Onto Cave Dale, this was a lovely climb, up ahead I was surprised to see two of the guys I had been in the group with earlier running at a very catchable pace! Before long I made my way past each, stopping for a quick chat but without much effort I found myself in 5th place moving away from them, managing a good pace along the top of Cave Dale all the way into Bradwell.

Sally on Win Hill, photo copyright of  Summit Fever Media

Sally on Win Hill, photo copyright of Summit Fever Media

 

More familiar faces, Isobel and Ken, appeared on the approach to the third feed station, 49 miles in and I was feeling ok! Quick chat, fill up of the water bottles, wetting of the Buff and hat and I was off for the final push.

Bradwell Edge is not a nice climb, at least it wasn’t quite the mud bath I have seen it every other time. It’s hard to get into a rhythm when you’re slipping and sliding on the mud but the really muddy sections were few and far between. It was still a relief to get onto the flat section along the river from Shatton to Hathersage, this was one of my favourite bits as it was shaded, fairly flat and nice and soft underfoot. As I crossed the railway line up the field from Hathersage I was relieved to know this was the last steep climb, and what a lovely suprise to hear the cow bells as Isobel and Julie ran across the field with Lotty and Karl from their house, so motivating for the last few miles.

 

Ian was still just about in sight (him in 4th, me in 5th place) as I climbed out of Hathersage onto Ringinglow Road, but then Ian had a real kick and pushed the pace. He was out of sight in no time, I thought with 6-7 miles to go that was far too early to push on, but he let me know at the finish, that’s where he spotted 2nd and 3rd place not far ahead! He managed to catch them but they pulled away as he’d put everything into the chase.

 

I carried on up to Carl’s Walk, relieved to be in the last few miles, picturing the beer and pizza at the finish! Turning onto Houndkirk Road I was able to get a good pace for 58+ miles, even managing a 8.53 min mile! Julie, Michael, Isobel and Ken again popped up unexpectedly at Houndkirk giving me a boost for the last effort. Through Limb Valley I was running the whole way, even the hills, I think all that caffine was getting me through these miles on a bit of a high!

 

My aim was for sub 11 hours so I was delighted to come into the finish at 10 hours 43 mins in 5th place, with a new female course record. It was only then I found out how close the 2nd – 4th place guys had been in front. It was probably best not knowing, as I would have pushed myself and no doubt suffered for it if I had thought to try to chase them down! Looking at the data I averaged 10’42 per mile at 5.6mph, a stat I’m really chuffed with considering the 2722m of ascent. If you like hilly races this is definitely one for you.

I just wanted to finish by saying thanks to the those who came out to support, the Smiley Paces were so  encouraging, it is so motivating to see a familiar face when you have raced all those miles and really spurred me on to the finish 🙂

 

 

Sally Fawcett over the finish line of the UTPD the Dig Deep Races 2014

Sally Fawcett over the finish line of the UTPD the Dig Deep Races 2014, Photo copyright of Summit Fever Media

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Dig Deep Peak District Weekend Programme 2014

Dig Deep Peak District 2014 – Friday 20th June at Whirlow Hall Farm, Whirlow Lane, Sheffield S11 9QF, 

0114 235 2678

Talk/Film programme

Friday 20th June at Whirlow Hall Farm, Whirlow Lane, Sheffield S11 9QF, 0114 235 2678

ENTRANCE IS FREE!

7pm – 8pm

James Andrews                        “Why I bother”

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James will be presenting a story of what he has learned about the human brain while running. James has been running ultras for about 7 years and over the past couple of years he has been reading and studying psychology. The talk is going to be a combination of what he has learned about the brain in the process, including;

  • What motivates it in general and throughout a race
  • How to deal with stress and paranoia that will attack you in a race
  • What to do when the task feels overwhelming, or boring, or pointless?
  • How to use your mental training to deal with novel event that might pop up in races
  • Some general tricks on making yourself feel awesome

Ultimately he hopes to answer the question “Why I bother?”

8.30 pm                         The Dragons back – Film

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The legendary Dragon’s Back Race™ follows the mountainous spine of Wales from Conwy Castle to Carreg Cennen Castle. This incredible 5-day journey is approximately 300 kilometres long with 17,000 metres of ascent across wild, trackless, remote and mountainous terrain. It is not a trail race.

The original Dragon’s Back Race™ happened in September 1992 and ever since, it has been whispered about with a mix of awe and trepidation. Its reputation had reached legendary status with fell, mountain and ultra runners the World over by September 2012 when the second Dragon’s Back Race™ happened.

The Dragon’s Back Race™ is one of the hardest mountain races in the World and this is the film of that event in 2012.

Saturday 21st June –at Whirlow Hall Farm, Whirlow Lane, Sheffield S11 9QF, 0114 235 2678

5pm                                    Iron Trail (film)

The Irontrail, held in Switzerland, breaks the 200 km barrier. With the start in Pontresina and the finish in Chur this film covers the event which Stages the Alpes’ highest altitude, longest, toughest and most beautiful single-stage trail race in the multi-faceted natural, cultural and mountain landscape of Graubünden – this is the thinking behind the Irontrail!

6pm – 7.30 pm           

Helen Bonser                        Taking on stage racing in the Alps

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Having grown up in the Lake District UK, and now living in Scotland, Helen has always been passionate about the outdoors and spending time in the hills. For her, hill running is a way of life, and is what continually pushes her forward – it enriches her life in adventure and rich friendships. Some of her favourite races are technical 1 day races in the Alps, and Alpine stage races, where she enjoys racing day after day in big mountain scenery. Helen still works full time, and it sometimes a challenge to fit both work and running in! Helen is a Mammut sponsored athelete.

Multi day stage races in the Alps are some of the most challenging and engaging racing experiences.  This talk gives a brief look into what’s involved, from the trails and terrain, to the training and preparation, and the racing itself, with examples from some of the major stage races currently in the Alps.

7.30pm – 8.50pm

Marcus Scotney                        The Peaks and troughs of Ultra Running

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The Peaks and troughs of Ultra Running – Team MONTANE International Ultra Runner Marcus Scotney will share, in his entertaining and motivational style, the highs and lows of his Ultra Running experiences where he has overcome physical and mental exhaustion and continued to dig deep rather than giving up.

9pm                                                 The Dragons back – Film

The legendary Dragon’s Back Race™ follows the mountainous spine of Wales from Conwy Castle to Carreg Cennen Castle. This incredible 5-day journey is approximately 300 kilometres long with 17,000 metres of ascent across wild, trackless, remote and mountainous terrain. It is not a trail race.

The original Dragon’s Back Race™ happened in September 1992 and ever since, it has been whispered about with a mix of awe and trepidation. Its reputation had reached legendary status with fell, mountain and ultra runners the World over by September 2012 when the second Dragon’s Back Race™ happened.

The Dragon’s Back Race™ is one of the hardest mountain races in the World and this is the film of that event in 2012.



James Adams to Speak at the Dig Deep series

We would like to introduce another elite ultra runner who will be speaking at both the Dig Deep Peak District and the Dig Deep Suffolk event.  James Adams is a popular figure in the ultra running world and you may have come across him in one of the many ultra running forums or heard about his epic run across America.  He has just released his first book to brilliant reviews, which, incidentally you can find on amazon here 😉 So without further ado I will let James introduce himself…

James Adams Running and Stuff

James Adams Running and Stuff

 

Hi. My name is James and I am a fairly normal person with a regular body and regular mind. I have however completed some endurance challenges that some might find extraordinary. I have run 150 miles in one go several times, run 200 marathons and ultra marathons and a couple of years ago ran across the USA, from Los Angeles to new York.  3200 miles in 70 days, that’s 45 miles a day in what was the worst heatwave in living memory. People say “you must be mentally tough to get through that kind of thing” and I agree, you must be. However I certainly don’t believe I am any more mentally resilient that the next guy. I get upset and angry and paranoid and jealous just like we all do. However I do believe I have some valuable insight into what goes on in the human mind when trying to complete endurance challenges. I have been running ultra marathons for seven years and studying psychology for three and I have made it my mission to try and join the two together. I will be presenting a story of what I have learned about the human brain while running. When I started ultra running I didn’t appreciate that I will be participating in an intense and long term psychological study of on. I think anyone studying psychology should spend a summer running across the States as I reckon you learn more about the human brain while puking your guts up on the side of a road in New Mexico than you would in a lecture theatre.  The talk is going to be a combination of the stuff I have run and what I learned about my brain in the process, including;

  • What motivates it in general and throughout a race
  • How to deal with stress and paranoia that will attack you in a race
  • What to do when the task feels overwhelming, or boring, or pointless?
  • How to use your mental training to deal with novel event that might pop up in races
  • Some general tricks on making yourself feel awesome

Ultimately I hope to answer the question “Why I bother?”

I have also written a book about my adventures over the last few years. Running and Stuff is available on amazon.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Running-Stuff-James-Adams-ebook/dp/B00J2E4OO8/ref=as_li_tf_mfw?&linkCode=wey&tag=runningandstu-21

My blog is here www.runningandstuff.com



92 Days To go…#DigDeepPeakDistrict !!

There is now 92 days to go until the UTPD trail ultra marathon and Amy has sent us her latest training installment.  You’ll be seeing a bit more of Amy in our next film where the emphasis will be on nutrition, which I’m sure many of you will agree is a bit of a minefield! There is so much information out there it’s hard to know where to start and what is right for one person isn’t always the best thing for another.  So hopefully our next film might be able to give you an idea on where to start and also an insight into how other athletes eat.  Happy training this weekend and now over to Amy…

trail running races in the peak district

“I’ve just finished the 12th week of my 25 week training plan for the UTPD, which has been a 60 mile week.  The whole plan looked really daunting when I stuck it on the wall at the end of last year, so it’s really satisfying to see I’ve now nearly reached the halfway point!

I’ve been really enjoying my long runs over the past few weekends. I think this is in part due to improving weather (a little bit of sun does a lot for morale!) and also part due to the fact that I have been noticing improvement in my performance – I feel like I’m hurting less and recovering faster than before and it’s good to think that my hard work is taking effect!

Amy Freeman, training for UTPD, in Mammut

Amy Freeman, training for UTPD, in Mammut

I ran my first long race of the year this weekend, the 32 mile Haworth Hobble, and I really enjoyed it. My first ultra was the Dig Deep Intro last July, which took me 7 hours to complete. The Hobble has similar elevation and is 2 miles longer, but I finished in 6 hours which I am super happy with. It was also nice to meet fellow UTPD first timer Drew, who recognised me from the training blog video, and chat about our training over post-race stew!

The UTPD is almost double the distance of my current long run, so I still have a lot of work to do and miles to clock in preparation.  But as I’m starting to see the effects of my training, I’m feeling confident I can get there. Fingers crossed!”

 

Check out our latest addition to the Dig Deep Race Series: Dig Deep Suffolk, 6th&7th September 2014.

Featuring 4 fantastic trail races through Suffolk:

5.5 mile Rendlesham Dash Suffolk Trail Race starts at 10:30am on Sunday 7th September £13.00

20KM Rendlesham Suffolk Trail race starts at 10:15am on Sunday 7th September £17.00

28 mile Suffolk Trail ‘Intro Ultra’ starts at 10am on Saturday 6th September £40.00

50 mile: ULTRA Tour of Suffolk  (Suffolk trail ultra marathon) starts at 8am on Saturday 6th September £55.00



Winter Training

The following article is written by Dave Taylor at Fell Running Guide: www.fellrunningguide.co.ukImage

Winter Training

Ok, you’ve signed up for a race next year and you know you should be out there training but the long hot summer is a distant memory and running doesn’t seem as enjoyable somehow!  So here’s a few tips to keep you training through these dark, wet winter months.

They say there’s no such thing as bad weather, I disagree, there’s some horrible weather!  Cold, wet, windy, foggy, hailstones, ice and snow.  You name it the British winter can throw it at us so we need to be well kitted out.

Shoes: off road running in winter means mud so you need something with a good grip.  Inov-8 Mudclaws and Salomon Fellcross are 2 examples of shoes that give excellent grip in the worst underfoot conditions.

Outer Layers: staying dry can mean the difference between enjoying your run and suffering.  Invest in a decent quality waterproofs (jacket and trousers).  Most races insist on carrying waterproofs so buying good quality lightweight kit is a good investment.  OMM Kamleika and Inov-8 Stormshell are worth looking at.

On cold dry days a windproof top such as the Inov-8 Race Elite is an ideal alternative to a full waterproof.

Mid / Base Layers: you need a material that will wick away perspiration.  There’s a wide choice from man-made to merino wool or a mix of both.  Your base layer needn’t be expensive but make sure it’s comfortable and doesn’t rub.  Personally I prefer something with merino wool for a bit of comfort.

I find that a long sleeved base layer under a wind or waterproof is sufficient on all but the coldest days but the danger comes if you need to stop or slow down for any reason, particularly if you are on the remote fells.  This is when an extra layer is needed.  I use a Primaloft jacket which offers excellent warmth to weight and packs down very small and is easily carried in a rucksack or larger bumbag.  An example is the OMM Rotor Smock.

For your legs a good pair of running leggings is needed.  Choose a pair with ankle zips that make them easier to get off when they’re wet and muddy, for example Inov-8 Race Elite tights.

Socks, Hat & Gloves:  Unfortunately at some point you’re going to get wet feet but a good woollen sock will help your feet stay wet and warm.  I use SealSkinz socks, which are sold as waterproof but in my experience aren’t!  However they do keep your feet damp and warm.

A hat is essential and can be anything that keeps your head warm but I wouldn’t get anything too bulky so that you can stow it easily in a pocket if you get too warm and have to take it off.  Something that covers your ears is best to keep out those icy winds.  I often use a buff as a hat with a second one around my neck.  This allows me to pull the bottom one up to make a balaclava to cover my mouth and nose if it’s really cold.

There is a huge selection of gloves to choose from.  A good windproof pair is worth a try.  Get a slightly bigger size to allow them to go on over a base pair for colder days.  For really cold days I recommend a pair of mitts such as Extremities Hot Bags but beware that your hands can get too warm sometimes!

Microspikes:  Don’t be put off by snow and ice.  Lots of people are reluctant to run off road in snow but it can be a really good workout and a bit of an adventure!  I’ve done lots of running wearing Kahtoola Microspikes which give excellent grip, particularly on ice and compacted snow.  Buy a pair of these and you actually look forward to it snowing – just like when you were a kid!

Headtorch:  Running off road at night can be good fun so don’t be afraid to get out to the countryside in the evenings just like you would do in summer.  Get together with a few friends and persuade them to come along for moral support, you’ll enjoy it!

Obviously you need a decent head torch and there’s a good choice of bright ones to be had nowadays.  It is possible to pay over £100 for a head torch but think about what you need it for; do you want it to light up the countryside like a lighthouse or will a lesser beam suffice.  Check the claimed battery life too especially if you plan on being out for a while.  USB rechargeable models such as the Petzl Tikka XP2 Core are a great idea.  I recommend using rechargeable batteries making sure that they’re fully charged before you venture out.  Runners doing the Ultra Tour of the Peak District may well be finishing in the dark so a torch that is reliable is important as is practising running off road in the dark.

Rucksacks & Bumbags:  With a bit more kit needed than in summer it might be that you prefer to use a running rucksack rather than a bumbag.  You shouldn’t need anything too big; the OMM Ultra 12 for example.  Remember that it won’t be waterproof so you need to bag anything inside that needs to stay dry.

Stay Safe:  Running in remote areas can be hazardous at any time of year but particularly so in winter when you’re more likely to get wet, cold, hungry and run out of daylight.  It’s a good idea to take more kit and food than you need.  Take an old phone (switched off) for emergencies, put a torch into your pack even if you aren’t planning on staying out too long, take a map & compass in case the visibility drops (and make sure you know how to use them!) don’t rely on your smartphone to get you out of trouble – the battery never ran out in a compass!

So get kitted out and enjoy your winter running.  See you out there!

Fell Running Guide www.fellrunningguide.co.uk

Most of the products mentioned can be found at Outside, Hathersage. http://www.outside.co.uk/collection/Dig+Deep+Race+Shop+Collection

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